Polly digs

Welcome to our blog series ‘Polly digs…’ , in which we chart the highs and lows of DigVentures’ own social media and community intern on her mission to find a job in archaeology!

Hi there! My name is Polly, and I am DigVentures’ communities and social media intern. I’m currently wading through archaeological career paths with Joe Flatman’s book Becoming an Archaeologist as my bible! I intend to keep track of all the experiences I’m going to face looking for life after university here in the Site Hut. Wish me luck!

May 29th 2013: the stats
Paid jobs applied for: 6 / Interviews: 2
Volunteering jobs: 2

Everyone loves backstage passes. Over the last few weeks I have been lucky enough to go behind-the-scenes at a couple of heritage attractions. It might not be backstage at Glastonbury, but it did make me feel like a bit of a rock star.

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The number one tourist attraction in Bath

Whilst visiting Bath recently, I got to take a look round the Museum of No.1 The Royal Crescent. No.1, an historically accurate recreation of a Georgian Town House, is the most popular tourist attraction in Bath and has recently been award Heritage Lottery Funding to expand into the neighbouring property of No.1a, which was originally the servant’s wing of the main house. The house won’t be opening to the public until June 21st so getting to wonder round the house as workers were still laying carpets and hanging pictures was a treat. I was able to see how much work goes into creating the museum – everything from sourcing accurate paint samples for the walls to learning how to hide modern appliances behind historically accurate coat hooks.

Which coin is real. See differences between real and fake.

Which of these coins do you think is the fake?

I was also invited to the press opening of the new permanent exhibition at the Tower of London, “Coins and Kings: The Royal Mint at the Tower”. Here I got to see the exhibition before it opened to the public. Walking round part of the Tower without crowds is very rare indeed. So I walked round at my leisure, had guided tours from the experts and got to play with the interactive games without feeling like I was too old to do so – it was all in the name of research. The exhibition was small but very interesting. It even included some of the archaeological artefacts found on digs within the Tower walls, which really showed how the exhibition tied together the history and archaeology of the site.

It is great to be given an insight into what work goes on behind the scenes, putting on exhibitions and getting museums up and running for the public. There are so many people backstage, running around to make these attractions interesting and accessible and fun for us. They don’t take centre stage, but the show couldn’t go on without them.

Follow Polly on twitter: @ArchPolly

Are you going through the same thing? Or, do you remember the days when this was you? Get in touch with Polly  and share your experiences, send encouragement and suggestions, and of course – job opportunities…

Comments are open at the bottom of the post, or you can send her a message

DigVentures is digging this summer – join our adventure here!

 

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